Fig Easter Bread Ring Recipe

Our Easter bread ring is filled with figs and almost too pretty to eat. Drizzle on cream cheese frosting—this Easter bread ring recipe is brunch-ready.

When the holidays come around, there’s nothing quite like waking up to festive breakfast foods like this warm sweet Easter bread ring that’s a favorite for Mother’s Day (though you could certainly break out this recipe for fall holidays too). A sweet dough combined with rich, fiber-filled Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid California Figs are twisted together to form a deliciously decadent Danish pastry. While this Easter bread ring recipe uses instant yeast, regular yeast can be substituted. Simply allow dough to rise until doubled in size (2-4 hours). Store cooked pastry in an airtight container for up to 2 days.

Fig Easter Bread Ring Recipe

Course Breakfast

Ingredients

Easter Bread Ring Dough

  • 2 1/4 teaspoons instant (quick rise) yeast
  • 3/4 cup milk, warmed to 110°F
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 large egg

Mission Fig Filling

  • 1 cup Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid California Figs
  • 1/2 cup tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

Egg Wash

  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon cold water

Cream Cheese Glaze (optional)

  • 4 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup powdered sugar

Instructions

Make the Easter Bread Ring Dough

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together yeast and warm milk. Set aside until yeast mixture begins to form a creamy foam, about 5 minutes.

  2. In a large bowl whisk together flour, sugar, and salt. Add yeast mixture, melted butter, and egg. Knead until dough comes together in a ball and no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl. Transfer dough to a greased bowl and cover with a clean damp towel. Set aside to rise for 20 minutes.

Make the Fig Filling

  1. 1. Process dried figs in food processor until finely chopped. Add softened butter, brown sugar, and cinnamon in the food processor. Pulse until mixture forms a paste.

Assemble and Bake

  1. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. Roll dough out into a large rectangle, approximately 14×9 inches. Spread fig paste over dough. Beginning at the long edge, tightly roll up the dough as you would if you were making cinnamon rolls.

  2. Leaving a 1-inch gap from the top, slice rolled dough in half lengthwise. Carefully turn cut dough centers so that fig layers are facing upwards.

  3. Twist the left strand of dough over the right strand, then continue until the entire dough has been twisted together. Shape twisted strand into a circle, pressing ends together. Transfer to a parchment-lined baking sheet.

  4. Cover with damp towel to rise again while oven is preheating. Preheat oven to 375°F. Whisk together egg and water. Brush danish with egg wash.

  5. Bake danish for 30-35 minutes.

Make Cream Cheese Glaze

  1. Whisk together cream cheese, softened butter, vanilla, and powdered sugar until smooth. Drizzle over danish, if desired, or simply sprinkle with sifted powdered sugar.

Recipe and photos by Jackie Bruchez

If you make this recipe, snap a photo and tag us @valleyfig —we’d love to see what you’re cooking on Instagram and Facebook!

Our Easter bread ring is filled with figs and almost too pretty to eat. Drizzle on cream cheese frosting—this Easter bread ring recipe is brunch-ready.

Fennel + Fig Make Ahead Quiche Recipe

Brunch well with make ahead quiche. Thinly shaved fennel and plump fig morsels mix with goat cheese in our crustless make ahead quiche recipe.

This make ahead quiche recipe is a guide map to a host of other quiche combinations. A traditional Lorraine of bacon, and Gruyere with a twist of Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid California Mission Fig morsels would be lovely here too, but what we really love about this make ahead quiche is how you can bake it the day before a brunch or holiday breakfast and then slice and warm it up the nest morning with fresh cups of coffee. Fennel and California Golden Figs come alive when sautéed in brown butter and white pepper adds a subtle heat. One thing to note, we pump up the heat high at first to kick-start the cooking, setting the edges of the quiche and adding a touch of color. Turning the heat down then allows the quiche to continue cooking until set in the middle.

Fennel + Fig Make Ahead Quiche Recipe

Course Breakfast
Servings 8 slices

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/2 fennel bulb, cored and thinly shaved or sliced (reserve fronds)
  • 9 ounces (1 1/2 cups) Blue Ribbon Orchard or Sun-Maid California Golden Figs, stemmed and sliced lengthwise, divided
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • 8 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup whole milk
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 4 ounces Parmesan cheese, freshly grated, divided
  • 2 tablespoons fennel fronds

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Mist a pie pan with cooking spray or lightly grease.

  2. Brown butter in a skillet set over medium heat, whisking and keeping an eye on the butter to ensure it doesn’t burn—butter will smell nutty and be the color of hazelnuts when it’s done. Toss in fennel, 1 cup sliced figs, 1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt, and white pepper. Cook until fennel softens, about 3 minutes. Remove from heat and cool.

  3. Meanwhile, lightly beat eggs. Whisk in milk and cream with remaining 3/4 teaspoon salt. Stir in 3/4 of the grated Parmesan, reserving the rest. Add in figs and fennel, stirring to combine. Pour into prepared pie plate. Sprinkle remaining Parmesan on top.

  4. Bake for 10 minutes. Then, turn heat down to 375°F and remove quiche from the oven to scatter fennel fronds and dot remaining fig slices on top. Immediately place it back in the oven to cook for 20 minutes, covering with foil at the 15-minute mark if the top is golden. Quiche is done when set and the middle doesn’t jiggle. Cool for 5 minutes before tipping onto a serving plate, slicing and eating.

Brunch well with make ahead quiche. Thinly shaved fennel and plump fig morsels mix with goat cheese in our crustless make ahead quiche recipe.

Recipe and photos by Annelies Zijderveld

If you make this recipe, snap a photo and tag us @valleyfig —we’d love to see what you’re cooking on Instagram and Facebook!

Our Favorite Healthy Dried Fig Recipes

Incorporating figs into healthy living has deep roots. When you eat figs in healthy dried fig recipes, you join legions of fig lovers throughout history. Did you know the early Olympic athletes used figs as a training food? Figs were also presented as laurels to the winners, becoming the first Olympic “medal.” In Roman times figs were considered to be restorative. They were believed to increase the strength of young people, to maintain the elderly in better health and to make them look younger with fewer wrinkles. –Pliny (52-113 AD).

Today, figs show up as easy snacks to eat out of hand or to incorporate into healthy dried fig recipes. Eating one half cup of figs has as much calcium as drinking one-half cup of milk. They are an excellent source of dietary fiber, and chock full of potassium, iron, and antioxidant-rich. They’re fat-free, cholesterol-free, and sodium-free, helping you meet today’s Dietary Guidelines established by the USDA. And, you don’t have to lean just on dried fig salad recipes to eat well (though we’ve got a bunch of those too!)

At Valley Fig Growers, we aim to be your one-stop shop for California Figs and sell them dried in Mission and Golden varieties, as well as fig spreads, chocolate enrobed figs, and even fig paste. You’ll find an incredible collection of recipes using our figs on our website including healthy dried fig recipes, recipes for special occasions, holidays, weeknight dinner ideas, desserts, snacks, and dried fig salad recipes.

We’ve cast a wide net and pulled together healthy dried fig recipes and dried fig salad recipes from around the internet and our website to inspire your home cooking. Share your favorite healthy dried fig recipe or dried fig salad recipe with us in the comments—whether you’re a home cook who finds recipes online or a blogger!

Dried Fig Salad Recipes


Farro & Fig Salad with Maple Tahini Dressing | Le Petit Eats

Farro and Fig Salad with Maple Tahini Dressing by Le Petit Eats
Have you ever eaten farro before? This hearty whole grain adds extra heft to a salad that might otherwise be a side dish. Here, dried figs, toasted walnuts, and goat cheese mix with arugula and an addictive maple tahini dressing. Bring this in parts to a picnic or potluck and toss before eating.

Tuscan Salad with Fig Tahini Dressing | Crumb Top Baking

Tuscan Salad with Fig Tahini Dressing by Crumb Top Baking
When summer is still a ways off, we turn to this salad. Made with kale, canned white beans, kalamata olives, and tomatoes, the secret sauce to this salad is the fig tahini dressing. Also, we love that because the kale is so sturdy, you can toss the salad in advance and it just gets better with time, letting the flavors marinate.

More Ideas for Your Salad Bowl

Beyond the Salad Bowl

Chicken Arugula Quinoa Bowls | The Mediterranean Dish

Chicken Arugula Quinoa Bowls by The Mediterranean Dish
Prep ahead and just assemble right before you eat. Suzy of The Mediterranean Dish even suggested you can buy a rotisserie chicken to make it even easier for lunch or last minute dinner during the work week.

Green Goddess Fig Nourish Bowls | Cotter Crunch

Green Goddess Fig Nourish Bowls by Cotter Crunch
Herby salad dressing teams up with two kinds of greens, spiralized apple, and California dried figs in a gluten-free, dairy-free, and vegan meal, making it the kind of light supper or lunch, perfect for oven-free days.

Savory Fig Ricotta Toast | Life, Love, and Good Food

Savory Fig Ricotta Toast by Life, Love, and Good Food
Sometimes you want a light bite either for a snack or even for lunch. This savory fig ricotta toast is your no-bake solution that piles the toppings on high for an open-faced sandwich with arugula, prosciutto, and figs.

More Ideas of Healthy Dried Fig Recipes Beyond the Salad Bowl

Pistachio Fig Coins with Rosewater Recipe

The best rosewater recipes add in the aromatic subtly, like our Pistachio Fig Coins with rosewater recipe. You process the ingredients into a roll that gets chilled and sliced into coins. They’re perfect for Nowruz celebrations or with tea.

The Iranian New Year, known as Nowruz, falls on March 21 at the Spring equinox. The holiday is all about fresh starts, the reawakening of nature, and encouraging good things like abundance, fertility, good health, and sweetness in the coming year. At Nowruz it’s customary to serve and gift small sweets, known as shirini, which are typically enjoyed with a glass of hot black tea. With their fragrant hint of rosewater and cardamom, these coins would be perfect on a New Year platter or serve a plate of these Persian desserts at teatime.

This dessert calls for both rose petals and rosewater, ingredients used frequently in Persian cuisine, both for their delicate floral flavor and striking appearance. A little goes a long way in rosewater recipes, so you’ll find this adds just enough rose essence. While rosewater is available at many Whole Foods markets, culinary grade rose petals are mostly found in Middle Eastern and Indian grocery stores, tea shops, and online; if you can’t find them you can make the pistachio crust with just the nuts and powdered sugar, but the rose and California Figs are the stars in this rosewater recipe.

Pistachio Fig Coins with Rosewater Recipe

Course Dessert
Servings 50 (1-inch) coins

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons powdered sugar
  • 2 tablespoons pistachios, toasted and salted, plus extra for garnish
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 2 tablespoons dried culinary rose petals, plus extra for garnish (optional)
  • 3 tablespoons almond butter
  • 3 tablespoons almond flour
  • 4 Medjool dates, pitted
  • 1 tablespoon rosewater
  • Pinch salt
  • 1 cup Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid California Figs, stemmed

Instructions

Make the Coating for the Coins

  1. In a food processor, combine the powdered sugar, pistachios, and cardamom, and pulse to form a coarse meal. Add the rose petals and pulse a few times, until the petals are broken down slightly but you can still see shreds of pink. Transfer to a sealed jar until ready to use.

Make the Pistachio Fig Coins

  1. Place the almond butter, almond flour, dates, rose water, and salt in the food processor and pulse until the mixture is smooth, scraping down the sides with a spatula as needed. Add the California Figs and pulse a few times until they’re just broken down but the mixture still has a firm, springy texture. Transfer to a clean work surface.

  2. Divide the fig dough into two equal size balls. With lightly oiled hands, roll each ball into a compact log 7” long by 1” in diameter. Chill the logs in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours, or ideally overnight, before slicing.

  3. Spread the coating in a rimmed dish. Using a serrated knife, slice the logs into ¼-inch thick coins. Working in batches, toss the coins in the coating until they are completely covered on both sides.

  4. Arrange the coins on a platter. Coarsely chop a spoonful of the extra pistachios and sprinkle them on top. Take a generous pinch of the extra rose petals and crush them in your palms over the platter. Serve with hot black tea.

  5. Store the coins in a parchment-lined cookie tin along with any extra coating, so you can quickly touch them up before serving.

Make the coin filling the night before, so it firms up and can be easily sliced into rounds before tossing in the pistachio crust. The coins store well in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks, but the white appearance of the powdered sugar will fade, so keep extra powdered sugar on hand for a quick touch-up.

Recipe and photo by Louisa Shafia

If you make this recipe, snap a photo and tag us @valleyfig —we’d love to see what you’re cooking on Instagram and Facebook!

Fig Hamantaschen

One of the traditional foods for the Jewish festival of Purim is a triangular cookie known as hamantaschen, said to represent the three-cornered hat worn by the Purim story’s villain, Haman. These cookies are usually filled with fruit jam or a poppy seed paste. In this easy hamentaschen recipe, California Fig puree provides the filling for these buttery, orange-scented cookies. Dip a corner of fig hamantaschen into melted chocolate for an extra-special treat! Cookies will keep for 2-3 days in an airtight container.

When Purim comes along, the first thing we want to bake is fig hamantaschen. Look no further for easy hamentaschen recipes filled with sweet dried fig.

Fig Hamantaschen

Course Dessert
Servings 24 cookies

Ingredients

Fig Hamantaschen Cookie Dough

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 10 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 orange

Fig Filling

  • 6 ounces Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid California Figs, chopped (about 1 1/3 cups chopped figs)
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon cardamom

Chocolate Glaze

  • 4 ounces semisweet chocolate chips
  • Additional orange zest and crushed pistachios for garnish (optional)

Instructions

Make Hamantaschen Dough

  1. Place the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in the bowl of a food processor and pulse a few times to combine. Add the butter and process for a few seconds until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

  2. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, egg yolks, vanilla extract and the zest of the orange. Add the egg mixture to the food processor and process for thirty seconds. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface, gather into a ball and knead until it comes together. Divide dough in half and form into two discs. Wrap each disc in plastic wrap and refrigerate for several hours or overnight.

Prepare the Fig Filling

  1. In a medium saucepan, combine the chopped figs, sugar, 3/4 of a cup water, and the juice from the orange. Bring the mixture to a boil, then turn down the heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the figs have softened, about 6-8 minutes. Remove mixture from heat and stir in the vanilla extract and the cardamom. Allow to cool slightly. Puree the fig mixture with an immersion blender or transfer to a food processor and puree.

Make the Cookies

  1. Remove one of the disks from the refrigerator and let it sit on the counter for 5-10 minutes to make it easier to roll out. Preheat oven to 350°F and line two baking sheets with silicone baking mats or parchment paper. Roll out dough on a well-floured surface with a floured rolling pin to 1/4 inch thickness. (Do not roll them too thin or the filling will leak.)

  2. Using a 4-inch round cookie cutter, or round drinking glass, cut out circles of dough.. Gather up the scraps and roll them out a second time to cut out more circles. (You should be able to get a dozen circles.) Place 6 circles on each cookie sheet.

Fill the Fig Hamantaschen

  1. Spoon a teaspoon of the fig puree in the center of the dough circle.

  2. Create the classic triangle shape for the fig hamantaschen, by doing a series of three folds. First, fold one side of the cookie in so that the edge comes to the middle of the jam filling. Fold the second side in the same way and so that it partially covers the first side. Finally, fold the remaining side up and in so that it overlaps the other two sides. Pinch the seams together. Chill the cookies for at least ten minutes prior to baking.

  3. Bake for 15 minutes until the cookies are golden brown. Cool on a wire rack. Repeat with the remaining disk of dough.

Make Chocolate Glaze

  1. Place the chocolate in a glass bowl and microwave on medium power for 30 seconds. Stir. (If chocolate is not completely melted, continue microwaving for thirty second-intervals and stirring until melted.)

  2. Dip one corner of each cookie into the melted chocolate. While chocolate is still wet, sprinkle on orange zest and/or crushed pistachios, if using. Return cookies to a cooking rack to allow the chocolate to harden.

Recipe and photos by Emily Paster

If you make this recipe, snap a photo and tag us @valleyfig —we’d love to see what you’re cooking on Instagram and Facebook!

Almond Roulade with Sweet Fig Paste Recipe

Baking a cake with almond flour adds flavor to roulade. If you’ve never made a roll cake, it’s easy and best filled with our sweet fig paste recipe.

An almond roulade is another name for an almond roll cake made with almond flour. Instead of buying the almond flour, you can easily make it at home in your food processor. There’s no flour used, so the roulade is a naturally gluten-free dessert. Try this recipe for your next event and perhaps even as a buche de Noel for Christmas (with mushrooms made of meringue).

This recipe may look complicated, but all the steps are easy! Make the sweet fig paste recipe with our Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid mission figs a day or two ahead of making the cake. While the cake is baking and cooling, make the mascarpone cream and chocolate glaze. You can even make the entire dessert a day ahead – cover and chill.

For a clean platter, line your plate or platter with parchment or wax paper, top with the rolled cake and then cover with the chocolate glaze. Remove the paper before serving.  

Almond Roulade with Sweet Fig Paste Recipe

Course Dessert

Ingredients

Sweet Fig Paste Recipe

  • 1 package (8-ounce) Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice Mission Figlets, stemmed and sliced
  • 1 1/2 cups orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons orange zest
  • Pinch of Salt

Almond Roulade

  • 1 1/2 cups blanched almonds, lightly toasted
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar, divided
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 6 large egg whites, at room temperature
  • 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1/4 teaspoon almond extract

Mascarpone Cream

  • 4 ounces (1/2 cup) mascarpone
  • Pinch of Salt
  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1/4 cup powdered (confectioners’) sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Chocolate Glaze

  • 4 ounces (60%) bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
  • Pinch of Salt

Instructions

Make Sweet Fig Paste Recipe

  1. In a saucepan, combine figs, orange juice, granulated sugar, zest and salt. Cover and bring to a boil, then lower heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Uncover and continue to cook for another 8 to 10 minutes or until figs are soft and 1/4 cup juice remains. Remove from heat and cool. Spoon into a blender or food processor; whirl to a smooth paste. This fig paste recipe can be made up to 2 days ahead. Store in a covered container in the refrigerator.

Make Almond Roulade

  1. In food processor bowl, combine almonds, 1/2 cup granulated sugar and cornstarch. Pulse until almonds are finely ground. Set aside.

  2. Adjust oven rack to middle position. Preheat oven to 325°F. Line a large 11-x-17-inch rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

  3. In a large, clean mixing bowl, combine egg whites and cream of tartar. Beat on medium-high speed until soft peaks form. Gradually beat in remaining 1/4 cup granulated sugar and almond extract; continue beating until stiff peaks form. With a spatula, gently fold in almond mixture. Spread in an even layer on parchment-lined sheet.

  4. Bake on middle oven rack for 18 to 20 minutes or until top is dry and color is light golden. Cool in pan on wire rack. While cake cools make Mascarpone Cream and Chocolate Glaze.

Make Mascarpone Cream

  1. Combine mascarpone and salt in a bowl. Beat with electric mixer on low speed until smooth. While mixing, slowly pour in cream. Add powdered sugar and increase speed to medium; beat until soft peaks form. Beat in vanilla. Cover and chill.

Make Chocolate Glaze

  1. Place the chocolate in a heatproof bowl. Bring the cream and salt to a simmer. Slowly stir the hot cream into the melted chocolate and stir until smooth. Cool.

Assemble Roll Cake

  1. Cover cake with a piece of parchment; invert onto a large flat cutting board or (or inverted baking pan the same size as the baked cake). Remove the baking pan and very carefully peel the parchment away from the cake. Spread the fig paste evenly on cake. Top with the mascarpone cream. Starting at one of the short ends, roll up cake around the filling. Place, seam side down, on a platter. Spread the chocolate glaze over the cake. Chill until ready to serve or up to 1 day ahead of serving. To serve, cut roulade into slices.

Recipe and photos by Lorelle del Matto

If you make this recipe, snap a photo and tag us @valleyfig —we’d love to see what you’re cooking on Instagram and Facebook!